NJSALTFISH.com

1000's of NJ Saltwater Fishing Reports, Dozens of Sources, Maps, Wrecks, Historical Search

No data available.

How NJ Fishing Regulations are Determined

 Fishing regulations have many purposes. The most critical purpose is conservation. As fisherman, we want to continue maintaining the population of marine species for future generations. We also do not want to disturb the equilibrium of the ecosystem. Too high or too low of a population of marine species can wreak havoc on other species as well.

Who Issues Marine Fishing Regulations?

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission manages the majority or marine species on a coast-wide basis with seasons and limits that they determine.

Those regulations must then be approved by the state of New Jersey’s Marine Fisheries Council. The Council usually addresses these issues at their March meeting with the management measures becoming effective in mid- to late April or early May. The Marine Digest is published in May. Regulations remain in effect until changed.

The Atlantic has thousands of Marine Species and each species is unique and has its place in the ecosystem. When regulations are made, it is vital that the unique considerations of each species be heard with an objective point of view, ensuring that no species was treated more important than others.

Because of this, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission created the Interstate Fisheries Management Program (ISFMP).

To give you a better visual of this flow, check out the picture below, which shows the different levels that make up the commission:

 Regulatory Process for New Jersey Fishing Regulations 

Let’s go over each board:

ISFMP Policy Board: The ISFMP Policy Board is comprised of the Commissioners from the fifteen member states and representatives of the District of Columbia (DC), the Potomac River Fisheries Commission (PRFC), NOAA Fisheries and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They meets at least bi-annually to establish and monitor the program.

Species Management Boards: These species-specific management boards are composed of Commissioners from the states that have declared an interest in the species’ management program. The management boards consider and approve the development and implementation of fishery management plans (FMPs), including the integration of scientific information, proposed management measures, and considerations for habitat conservation and the management of protected species/fishery interactions. All Commission boards/sections and committee meetings are held in accordance with Robert’s Rules of Order. The species management boards establish and oversee the activities of their respective Plan Review Teams, Plan Development Teams, Technical Committees and Advisory Panels. 

Technical Committees: Species technical committees are comprised of representatives from each state, jurisdiction, and federal agency with a declared interest in the fishery. Technical committees are responsible for providing the species management boards the best scientific information available for guidance in the management process.

Advisory Panels: Advisory panel members are citizens who represent a cross-section of commercial and recreational fishing interests and other stakeholders who are concerned about fisheries conservation and management. The Advisory Panel provides the Management Board with advice concerning species’ management activities.

Plan Development and Review Teams: Species Plan Development Team is responsible for preparing all documentation necessary in the development of a FMP, Amendment, or Addendum. Once a management program is adopted by a Species Management Board, the Plan Review Team is responsible for providing annual advice concerning implementation of the management program. 

 

Development of the Management Plan

For a fishery management plan to begin development, a problem must be identified with one of the Commission managed species.

This problem can be identified by a species management board, as a direct result of new scientific research, or through stakeholder input.

Once the problem is identified, the species management board tasks the species plan development team with the creation of a plan proposal. The species plan development team will seek advisement and assistance or input from the technical committee, advisory panel, and Law Enforcement Committee.

The plan is then distributed for public comment and may be held in states with an interest in the fishery. After hearing public comment and concern, the board takes considerations and recommendations of the species technical committee.

Public comment is where we, as fisherman and conservationists, come into play. Let’s learn a bit more about it.

 

Public Input and the Advisory Panel Process

Since the species plan development team relies on public comment, it must be recognized how important our voices as fisherman play as a role in marine regulations.

We provide input to the commission members, we can attend public information meetings and hearings serving the Advisory Panel.

 

What is the Advisory Panel?

The Advisory Panel process was born as part of a result of the Commission’s increasing responsibility under the Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act.

The Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Act mandates, among other things, that the Commission provide adequate public participation in its fisheries management planning process, including at least four public hearings (for amendments and new plans) and procedures for submission of written comments to the Commission. Today, we have 21 active advisory panels that provide advice to management boards and sections for all of the species managed through the Commission process.

Here is a picture of how the ASMFC works:

 b

 

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

There are many ways to become involved in the Commission’s fisheries management process. Here are some suggestions:

Attend Commission Meetings

All Commission meetings are open to the public. Interested parties are encouraged to attend to learn more about Commission activities and share their views (click here to learn more about guidelines for public participation at species board meetings). Find out about the Commission’s meetings by subscribing to Fisheries Focus -- the Commission’s monthly newsletter that is available free of charge. You can also learn about upcoming meetings via our Meetings page.

Become an Advisory Panel Member

The Commission has 21 active species advisory panels for diadromous, shellfish and marine fisheries. Contact your state Commissioners if you are interested in becoming a member.

Attend Public Hearings

The fishery management plan development process calls for public meetings and public hearings to solicit public views on proposed management actions. Attend these meetings to learn more and express your views.

Mail, Fax or Email Your Comments

Submitted comments are forwarded to the appropriate management board and/or Commission staff for review and incorporation in the public record. You can email, mail, fax comments to the Commission using the contact information below.

 

Contacts

Toni Kerns, Director, Interstate Fisheries Management Program
Tina Berger, Director of Communications

Guiding Documents

ASMFC Compact, Rules and Regulations (revised February 2016)

ISFMP Charter (revised February 2016)

ASMFC Appeals Process

Conservation Equivalency: Policy and Technical Guidance Document (October 2016)

Technical Support Group Guidance and Benchmark Stock Assessment Process (February 2016)

Advisory Panel Primer

Advisory Panel Nomination Form

Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act (1993)

 

 

Latest NJ Bonito Reports

  • 2017-09-15 Ristori Bay Head

    Some pretty good weather is ahead of us, and anglers should take advantage of it since there's a tropical storm warning posted for Tuesday. There's already a large swell on the beach, and that will get even larger if Jose continues to swirl around offshore. Ocean chumming for bonito, little tunny and chub mackerel has generally been very good.

  • 2017-09-07 Miss Belmar Belmar

    This morning, we fished on the beach on bird life. We had some albies, bonito and blues in the morning. Once the tide changed, we lost the albies but boy oh boy did the blues bite! We SLAUGHTERED THE BLUES with most anglers onboard catching their limits and some! (but only keeping their limits) They ranged anywhere from 2-5 lbs. Ava 27s, both plain and tailed, worked the best.

  • 2017-09-04 Miss Belmar Belmar

    Today, we sailed out into the horizon east of our port. We anchored up along the edge of the mud hole and started the mackerel immediately. We were able to catch them and keep them all around the boat all day long. We had numerous bonito and some nice sized albies also in the catch. Everything was caught on 007 jigs.

  • 2017-09-02 Ristori Bay Head

    The best report today came from the Golden Eagle out of Belmar which reported a super day of fishing for bonito, little tunny and chub mackerel -- along with a 20-to-25-pound yellowfin tuna boated and another lost. Hopefully, those mullet will move out into the ocean after Sunday's east winds to get the fall surf striper run started early.

  • 2017-09-02 Miss Belmar Belmar

    This morning, we had another excellent day of fishing east of shark river inlet. We anchored up along the edge of the mud hole again and started the mackerel right away. We continued to catch the macs along with some nice sized bonito and jumbo sea bass (which had to go back)

  • 2017-09-01 Miss Belmar Belmar

    This morning, we had another good day of angling. We anchored up along the edge of the mud hole well east of shark river inlet. It didn't take long to start the mackerel and it got better as the day went on with some bonito and a couple of albies mixed in. It was an excellent day of fishing!

  • 2017-08-31 BHCFA Beach Haven

    The captains of the Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association used the forced time off to tend to various items on their boats that might have needed attention.

    Last weekend Captain Ray Lopez had the Jayhee Cho party out for a trolling trip at the Barnegat Ridge. The group managed to boat multiple false albacore and one nice Bonita 

  • 2017-08-31 Miss Belmar Belmar

    We ran offshore today and anchored up along the edge of the mud hole. Mackerel fishing was good all day long and we also had bonito and albies in the mix. For the anglers who bottom fished, they were able to stay busy with jumbo sea bass!

  • 2017-03-30 Ristori Bay Head

    When I called a few years ago to question that listing, they conceded that they were using an outdated assessment though the coastal run had disappeared and even the big commercial boats were hardly catching any mackerel far offshore. His daughter, Natalie, was aboard Monday as they had hits every cast with live pilchards to Spanish mackerel and ladyfish, but could only manage a couple of small redfish (red drum) from among lots of non-biters.
  • 2017-01-17 Ristori Bay Head

    Yet, sailfishing had been good Monday, and it was quite fishable for Capt. Scott Stanczyk on Catch 22 from Bud N' Mary's Marina. Unfortunately, there wasn't much action and the sails were very small -- making them difficult to hook on the balao they preferred.

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Web Analytics